What’s the Difference Between the E-2 and EB-5 Investor Visas?

handshakeFor foreign investors wishing to obtain a visa to live, work, and attend university in the United States with in-state tuition rates, there are two options available through the E-2 and EB-5 investor visa programs.

The E-2 Visa requires less startup capital (around USD $100,000 to $250,000) and is the fastest way to obtain a visa, although it is not a path to Legal Permanent Residency (Green Card). The E-2 is a temporary visa based on a reciprocal commercial treaty between the United States and the individual’s country of nationality.  The visa is only available to treaty countries, for which citizens of China, India, Russia, and Brazil are not eligible.  Its processing times are generally 2 weeks to 90 days. Continue reading

Looking for Path to a Green Card? Try the EB-5 Investor Visa

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq.

For foreign investors wishing to obtain a visa to live, work, and attend university in the United States with in-state tuition rates, there are two options available through the E-2 and EB-5 investor visa programs.  The E-2 Visa requires less startup capital and is the fastest way to obtain a visa, although it is not a path to Legal Permanent Residency (Green Card).  The EB-5 Visa requires an initial investment of USD $500,000 to $1 million, and comes with Legal Permanent Residency (Green Card), and ultimately, US citizenship.  This article will discuss the EB-5 “million dollar visa” option.  What may be surprising is that an investor can be eligible for this visa with only a $500,000 investment in a rural or targeted employment area. Continue reading

As Canada Eliminates its Immigrant Investor Program, International Investors Shift Their Focus to the US for Economic and Residency Opportunities

By Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Anthony Mance, Esq.

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Canada terminates investor visa program

In a statement made on the evening of February 11, 2014, the Canadian government announced that it intends to terminate both the Federal Immigrant Investor Program (IIP) and Federal Entrepreneur (EN) program by abolishing it from the 2014 federal budget.  In doing so, it plans to eliminate 66,000 backlogged applications and refund $2 million in filing fees.  In 2011, approximately 10,000 immigrants entered Canada through the IIP, while almost 1,000 entered through the EN program.  In recent years, it has taken an average of 54 months to issue investor visas, and even longer for entrepreneur visas.  It would take an estimated six years to process the backlogged applications. Continue reading

EB-5 Investor Alert: 8 Tips for Avoiding Investor Visa Scams

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s Office of Investor Education and Advocacy and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services are jointly issuing this Investor Alert to warn individual investors about fraudulent investment scams that exploit the Immigrant Investor Program, also known as “EB-5.”

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (“SEC”) Office of Investor Education and Advocacy and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) are aware of investment scams targeting foreign nationals who seek to become permanent lawful U.S. residents through the Immigrant Investor Program (“EB-5”).  In close coordination with USCIS, which administers the EB-5 program, the SEC has taken emergency enforcement action to stop allegedly fraudulent securities offerings made through EB-5.

Continue reading: http://1.usa.gov/1gq7Gnf

How to Obtain a Green Card Through the “Million Dollar Investor Visa” (EB-5)

Photo credit: BackBoris2012 http://bit.ly/16lqWde

Photo credit: BackBoris2012 http://bit.ly/16lqWde

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq.

The Immigrant Investor Program, also known as “EB-5,” was created by U.S. Congress in 1990 to stimulate the United States economy through job creation and capital investment by foreign investors.  Under a pilot immigration program first enacted in 1992 and regularly reauthorized since, certain EB-5 visas also are set aside for investors in Regional Centers designated by USCIS based on proposals for promoting economic growth.  Following growing rates of applications, there have been new regional centers cropping up rapidly to accommodate these investments. Continue reading