New Laws for California Employers in 2015

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Gayane Khechoomian, Esq.

Photo gcazzo.blogspot.com

Photo gcazzo.blogspot.com

The California legislature has passed numerous laws that will take effect January 1, or July 1, 2015.  Employers must revise their policies to reflect the new laws.  We have provided a summary of these new laws below.   Continue reading

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Increases in IRS Mileage Reimbursement Rates for 2015

© Jennifer Grady

© Jennifer Grady

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2015, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car, van, pickup, or panel truck will be:

57.5 cents per mile for business miles driven
23 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes
14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

The business expense reimbursement rates have increased 1.5 cents from 56 cents per mile in 2014.  The medical and moving expense rates will decrease one-half cent from the 2014 rates.  The charitable rate is based on statute.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

For more information, visit the IRS website.

The Grady Firm Now Offers Customized Record-Keeping Forms for Employers

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Gayane Khechoomian, Esq.

personnel files pic

California enacted numerous new laws in 2014 that continue to make it more challenging for employers to comply with California employment law.

To take out some of the guesswork that employers and Human Resources managers face as they try to run their businesses, The Grady Firm, P.C. has created a package of over fifteen (15) customized forms and checklists to ensure that employers are properly documenting their procedures before hiring, at the time of hire, during employment, and at termination. Continue reading

New Paid Sick Leave Requirements for California Employers Starts July 1, 2015

By Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Gayane Khechoomian, Esq.

sick leaveStarting on July 1, 2015, a new law affecting millions of Californians will require that employers – both public and private – provide paid sick leave to all their employees. The “Healthy, Workplace, Healthy Families Act” (AB-1522) signed into effect by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. applies to all employees who work in California for 30 or more days in a year. The law defines “employer” as any person employing another under any appointment or contract of hire” regardless of how many employees they have,  and covers employees whether they are full-time, part-time, seasonal, or temporary. Specifically, the new provision provides that employees who work 30 or more days within a year from commencement of their employment will earn a minimum of one hour of paid sick leave for every thirty (30) hours worked.

Employees become entitled to their sick leave beginning on the ninetieth (90th) date of employment. However, an employer may limit an employee’s use of paid sick days to 24 hours—or three (3) days—in each year of employment. Click HERE for the full text of the new law. Continue reading

San Francisco Board of Supervisors Passes Fair Chance Ordinance, Creating New Requirements for Employers During the Hiring Process

San Francisco City Hall. Justin Sullivan/Getty images.

San Francisco City Hall. Justin Sullivan/Getty images.

by Gayane Khechoomian

As of August 13, 2014, San Francisco businesses with 20 or more employees are required to review an individual’s qualifications before inquiring about that person’s arrest and conviction record(s) and related information.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed the Fair Chance Ordinance (“FCO”) requiring that employers limit the use of criminal history information and follow certain procedures and restrictions when inquiring about and using conviction history information.

Specifically, the ordinance outlines (1) which criminal arrest and conviction records cannot be used during the hiring process, (2) when employers can ask about criminal arrests and convictions, and (3) what interactive process the employer must engage in with regard to the individual’s arrest and conviction record.

In addition, employers covered by the FCO must include in all job ads or solicitations a statement that the employer will consider qualified applicants with criminal histories in a manner consistent with the requirements of the FCO.

The ordinance covers all jobs temporary, seasonal, part-time, contract, contingent, and commission-based. It also covers those who do work through a temporary or employment agency, and educational or vocational training.

Read more here.

The Grady Firm. P.C. attorneys provide employment document drafting and legal counsel for business owners and Human Resources Managers.  To learn how we may be able to assist you, schedule a complimentary 15-minute consultation with our attorneys here, or call (323) 450-9010.

12 Tips for Effective E-Mail Communication

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq.

ImageWhile emails can provide us with the means to communicate with more people in a single day than ever before, they can also be a huge time-waster and permanent record of our blunders.  Read below for 12 ways to communicate more effectively through email.

Efficiency

1. At the beginning of the day, scan your inbox for urgent messages, and only respond to the ones that are most important or time-sensitive.  Spend the rest of the time you would waste on reading junk mail to prioritize your day.  This way, you will start your day with focus and motivation. Continue reading

What Should You Include in Written Warnings to Employees?

Original Source: Southland Data Processing  (SDP) website: http://bza.me/?9JERA7

Signing a contractIn order to strengthen your defense against an employee-initiated action, you must include a well-drafted memo in an employee’s personnel file at the time of any incident.  Most written warnings and disciplinary memos are inadequate because they fail to include several very important elements.

Whether you have to defend against an undeserved unemployment insurance claim or against a wrongful discharge lawsuit, you want to include the following items in warning and disciplinary memos: Continue reading

How to Plan for Health Care Reform in 2013 and 2014 and Avoid Penalties

by Adam Minow, CPA

ImageIn the coming months, many Americans will need to make a decision regarding their health care insurance.  This decision is being prompted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that President Obama signed into law in 2010, which is also commonly referred to as Health Care Reform or Obamacare. Individuals who do not obtain health insurance coverage by March 31, 2014 may face penalties of up to 1.0% of their income in 2014 (the “Individual Mandate”).  Those penalties increase to up to 2.5% of income in 2016.  The Individual Mandate generally applies to self-employed individuals, unemployed individuals and individuals who are not already covered by another qualifying plan, including employer-sponsored plans, Medicare and COBRA. Continue reading