California Labor and Employment Updates for 2018

CapitolThe California Legislature has passed the following labor and employment bills, which will become law effective January 2018.

PRIOR SALARY AND PRIOR CONVICTIONS

Salary History Information

AB 168 prohibits employers from asking job applicants for “salary history information,” which includes both compensation and benefits.  But where an applicant “voluntarily and without prompting” discloses salary history information, the employer may rely upon the information in setting the applicant’s starting salary.  As a result, questions about prior salary may not be asked in job applications or interviews by an employer or an agent of the employer.

Additionally, AB 168 requires employers to provide the pay scale for a position if the applicant requests it.  This bill makes California the first jurisdiction in the country to require that employers provide applicants with the pay scale for a position, upon “reasonable request.”

This bill applies to employers, both private and public, and will become effective January 1, 2018. Continue reading

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City of San Francisco Announces its 2016 Increased Employer Healthcare Spending Rates

San Francisco increases healthcare spending law Photo © Jennifer Grady

San Francisco increases employer healthcare spending law rates. Photo © Jennifer Grady

The City of San Francisco has announced the 2016 rates for its employer health care spending law, under which employers must either contribute a specified amount toward their employees’ health care costs on a regular basis, or pay into a city health care fund for San Francisco residents.  Employers with workers in San Francisco will have to pay more next year to comply with the city’s health care spending law.

Beginning January 1, 2016, the health care expenditure rate for employers with 100 or more employees will be $2.53 per hour, and the rate for medium-sized businesses with 20-99 employees will be $1.68 per hour.
The health care expenditures must be made on behalf of employees employed for more than 90 days and who regularly work at least eight hours per week in San Francisco. Businesses with 19 or fewer employees and nonprofits with 49 or fewer employees are exempt.