U.S. House Passes Significant ‘Dreamer’ Immigration Bill with Potential to Grant Permanent Residency to 2 Million Undocumented Youth

On Tuesday, June 4, 2019, the U.S. House of Representatives passed an ambitious immigration bill aimed at providing a path to citizenship to almost 2 million undocumented immigrants, including “Dreamers” who were brought to the United States as children.  This bill cancels and prohibits removal proceedings against certain aliens, and provides such aliens with a path toward Legal Permanent Resident status.

The bill, titled American Dream and Promise Act of 2019, would provide a 10-year conditional permanent residency to recipients of the Differed Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and for other qualified young, undocumented, immigrants. To be eligible, immigrants must have been younger than 18 when they came to the U.S., and must have lived in the U.S. continuously over the previous four years.  Applicants will also need to possess an American high school diploma or GED, and pass a background check. Applicants who have committed certain crimes would be ineligible under the bill.

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA): A Way For Child Immigrants With Unlawful Presence to Obtain Work Authorization and a 2-Year Deferred Action from Removal Proceedings

Photo credit: epSos.de

September 15, 2013-

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain individuals who came to the United States as children and meet several key guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal, and would be eligible for work authorization.  Individuals who receive deferred action will not be placed in removal proceedings, or removed from the United States, for a specific period of time unless terminated.   Deferred action, however, does not provide an individual with lawful status, but can be utilized for individuals in removal (deportation) proceedings.  DACA relief is discretionary and can be revoked by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) at any time. Continue reading