California Labor and Employment Updates for 2018

CapitolThe California Legislature has passed the following labor and employment bills, which will become law effective January 2018.

PRIOR SALARY AND PRIOR CONVICTIONS

Salary History Information

AB 168 prohibits employers from asking job applicants for “salary history information,” which includes both compensation and benefits.  But where an applicant “voluntarily and without prompting” discloses salary history information, the employer may rely upon the information in setting the applicant’s starting salary.  As a result, questions about prior salary may not be asked in job applications or interviews by an employer or an agent of the employer.

Additionally, AB 168 requires employers to provide the pay scale for a position if the applicant requests it.  This bill makes California the first jurisdiction in the country to require that employers provide applicants with the pay scale for a position, upon “reasonable request.”

This bill applies to employers, both private and public, and will become effective January 1, 2018. Continue reading

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AB 60 to Extend Lawful Driving Privileges to Undocumented Immigrants

© Jennifer Grady

© Jennifer Grady

On September 12, 2013, with a vote of 50 to 25, California state Legislature voted to approve bill AB60, which would allow the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue an original driver’s license to a person who is (1) unable to submit satisfactory proof that the applicant’s presence in the United States is authorized under federal law, if he or she meets all other qualifications for licensure, and (2) provides satisfactory proof to the Department of his or her identity and California residency.  Governor Jerry Brown is expected to sign the measure, which will overturn a two-decade-old ban against issuing driver’s licenses to undocumented immigrants who were unable to present a valid social security number (excluding certain people who qualified for federal work permits under DACA).  This measure has largely been touted as a public safety reform that would permit immigrants to drive lawfully when required to obtain necessary services, obtain auto insurance, and pass a safety exam that requires knowledge of California driving laws.  Continue reading