The Grady Firm to Host 2018 Labor Law Update Seminar on February 7 in Beverly Hills, CA

Beverly hillsOn Wednesday, February 7, 2018, Jennifer Grady, Esq. will host the 2018 Labor Law Update, sponsored by The Grady Firm, P.C. and the California Employers Association (CEA) in Beverly Hills, California. This event will cover recent, drastic changes to employment law and how such changes may impact California employers.  There will be time for Questions and Answers at the end of the presentation, and the opportunity to network with other business owners.

Governor brown signs lawsLate last year, Governor Jerry Brown signed more than 800 new bills into law. Many new laws significantly impact employers, including: Continue reading

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New Policy Requirements for Employers Effective April 1, 2016

EmployeeHandbook_Pop_6467Beginning April 1, 2016, California employers with five or more total employees (whether or not all of those employees live in California) must update their anti-discrimination, anti-harassment, and complaint-investigation policies, and distribute them to employees for signature. These policies must be in compliance with recent amendments to California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), and must be distributed to all employees.

attorney clientThe new regulations include the following:

  • Provides for additional protected classes under the FEHA;
  • Clarifies harassment liability;
  • Updates legal standards and legal remedies of discrimination;
  • Revises complaint procedures;
  • Clarifies the investigation process;
  • Expands record-keeping requirements; and
  • Expands the rights of pregnant employees and employees with service animals.

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California Cities and Counties “Ban the Box” That Asks About Criminal History on Job Applications

jobapplicationIt’s a familiar box on any job application. “Check here if you have ever been convicted of a crime in a court of law.” But is it legal?

Recent US Census results illustrate that as many as 70 million American adults have a criminal record of some kind. In California, as many as 1 in 4 adults has an arrest or conviction in their history. Employers are reluctant to hire individuals with such a background, even though they may otherwise be well-qualified. Supporters of the so-called “Ban the Box” movement, which would remove application screening questions pertaining to an individual’s criminal history, aim to level the playing field between job-seekers. Continue reading