The Grady Firm, P.C. Celebrates Its Seventh Anniversary

On March 19, 2019, The Grady Firm, P.C. celebrated its seventh anniversary. Since its inception in 2012, the firm has grown from supporting startups in the Silicon Beach region of Los Angeles, to adding immigration and employment law departments for dynamic, rapid-growth international clients with a California presence. The Firm has added multiple attorney specialists in each discipline, and offices in Beverly Hills, Irvine, and San Diego, California. Our network of tech-savvy, multi-lingual attorneys are fluent in Spanish, Italian, German, and Farsi. They are licensed in California, and can practice immigration in all 50 U.S. states.

In addition, the firm has partnerships with intellectual property and non-profit attorneys licensed domestically in Texas, Louisiana, and Washington, and with attorneys that specialize in immigration, business, and real estate licensed internationally in Canada, Italy, and Germany.

The Grady Firm has a diverse roster of clients that work in the fields of automotive repair, communications, construction, entertainment, beauty and wellness, fashion, life science, landscape construction and maintenance, marketing/branding, nightclubs, professional services, restaurants, retail, sports coaching, software engineering, startups, technology, and transportation.

Over the past year, we have broadened the scope of our immigration practice to include H-2B visas for ski resort and landscape industry employees, in addition to already helping our clients obtain visas, Green Cards, and citizenship based on family relations, investment or employment through the EB-1, E-2, EB-3, E-3, EB-5, F-1, H-1B, L-1, J-1, O-1, P, and TN categories.

We expanded our employment law practice as outside employment counsel/Human Resources support to our corporate clients that need help hiring, firing, and disciplining their employees, and bringing top talent to the United States from abroad. In particular, our firm helps Human Resources departments stay compliant with California’s new Sexual Harassment Prevention law that mandates training for employers with 5+ employees to train their employees on sexual harassment prevention biannually, and within six months of hire or promotion of supervisors.

The Grady Firm fifth anniversary party in 2017

The Grady Firm thanks its attorneys, clients, and referral partners for their support and confidence over the years.

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All California Employers with 5+ Employees Must Provide Sexual Harassment Training by 2020, Even if Trained in 2018

HARASSMENTOn September 30, 2018, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law S.B. 1343, which now requires that employers with 5 or more employees in California provide 1 hour of sexual harassment and abusive conduct training to non-managerial employees, and 2 hours for managerial employees once every two years. Managerial employees must receive training within 6 months of hire or promotion. New hires must receive training within 6 months of hire.

BY WHAT DATE MUST EMPLOYEES BE TRAINED?

calendarOriginally, all managerial and non-managerial employees must have received training by January 1, 2020. However, Governor Gavin Newsom extended this deadline in September 2019 with SB 778 to January 1, 2021.  Training must then be completed every two years thereafter.  New hires and Supervisors must be trained within 6 months of hire, or promotion to supervisor.

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New Year, New Company Policies

business partnersAs companies grow and evolve over time, it soon becomes clear that they will outgrow their employee and operations policies–that is, if they even had any in the first place!  The best time for a CEO, COO, CFO, and Human Resources Department is to reassess these policies is at the end of the year, and to roll out new policies at the start of a new year.  Every January, there are changes that will take place anyway (such as updated IRS mileage reimbursement rates and local minimum wage rates), so it’s a good time to include policy updates when you provide this information to employees all at once.  There are numerous policies you can begin revising now to issue to your staff in January. Read further to begin your end of year action plan:

1. Employee Handbook

EmployeeHandbook_Pop_6467.jpgThe first item that should be addressed is the company Employee Handbook. If your company does not have one, or has not updated an existing one in more than a year, it’s time to speak with an attorney about creating or updating your Handbook.  In fact, for companies that have more than 5 employees, a Handbook is a no-brainer because it will have clauses in it that you are required to provide to employees (for example, Pregnancy Disability Leave is available for employees at companies with 5 or more employees, and the Employee Handbook is the best place to provide this information to employees).  Besides using the Handbook as the opportunity to explain all of the California mandatory leave-laws, paid sick leave time, and cell phone reimbursement policy, you can use this as a forum to explain the company’s social media, use of technology, dress code, tardiness, absentee, and drug/alcohol use policies. You can also outline which behaviors will result in discipline or termination. Continue reading

Cities and Counties Across California Increased the Minimum Wage Again on July 1, 2018- Is Yours Included? (See Our Chart)

los angelesTen cities and counties across California increased their minimum wages again on July 1, 2018, including the following:

  1. El Cerrito
  2. Emeryville
  3. City of Los Angeles
  4. County of Los Angeles (unincorporated areas)
  5. Malibu
  6. Milpitas
  7. Pasadena
  8. San Francisco City and County
  9. San Leandro; and
  10. Santa Monica.

Employers should examine the rules for every jurisdiction in which they operate, not just the one or more where they might have offices. As different municipalities have different definitions of “covered employer” and/or “covered employee,” employers may be faced with different rules for the various jurisdictions in which they do business.  When there are conflicting requirements in the laws, the employer must follow the stricter standard – the one that is the most generous to the employee.

For example, a delivery company with drivers routinely working in multiple cities or counties each week may well have separate minimum wage compliance issues simultaneously.  For some cities, these rates apply when an employee works just two or more hours per week in the jurisdiction.  It is therefore imperative that you check the requirements for each city in which your employees work.

A covered employer must also conspicuously post an updated wage notice/bulletin for each applicable jurisdiction. Click the above city/county link(s) to download the most current notice.

California picAs of January 1, 2018, the California minimum wage is $11.00 for employers with 26 or more employees, and $10.50 for employers with 25 or fewer employees.  This will increase to $12.00/ $11.00 respectively on January 1, 2019.

In addition, the cities below have their own minimum wage ordinances that go into effect on January or July each year (with the exception of Berkeley).  See the chart below for more details: Continue reading

California Minimum Wage Increases on January 1, 2018

minimum wageCalifornia Minimum Wage Rate Increase

Beginning on January 1, 2018, the minimum wage in California will increase to the following:

  • Employers with 25 employees or less must pay employees at least $10.50 per hour, and
  • Employers with 26 employees or more must pay employees at least $11.00 per hour.

Ten cities and counties across California will increase their minimum wages again on July 1, 2018. For the most comprehensive and up-to-date chart of minimum wage rates by city and county across California, see our article.

Keep in mind that some California counties and cities have higher minimum wages with which employers must comply.  Cities and counties are allowed to establish minimum wage rates that are higher than state and federal minimum wage laws.  When there are conflicting requirements in the laws, the employer must follow the stricter standard – the one that is the most generous to the employee.

Prior to 2012, only five localities had their own minimum wage laws.  In the last five years, the trend towards more expansive local minimum wage amounts has caught on in cities and counties across the state.  Currently, 39 counties and cities have enacted their own minimum wage laws.  For information on the latest minimum wage laws in U.S. cities and counties, click here.

The following are minimum wage rates for some major California counties and cities: Continue reading

The Grady Firm Selected as California Employers Association Partner Firm

CEA

The Grady Firm is pleased to announce that it has been selected to serve the the  California Employers Association, which serves 9,000 businesses throughout the state of California, as a  “Partner Law Firm” and on-demand outside legal counsel.  As a Partner Firm, The Grady Firm will offer legal counseling, training, litigation defense, and discounts to CEA members on its legal services.

As a one-stop shop for business owners, the Grady Firm is one of two member firms supporting CEA’s Southern California members, and the only firm specializing in the following areas: employment advising; employment/wage and hour litigation;  sexual harassment training; immigration, an business law.  All services are offered in English and Spanish.  As a Partner Firm, The Grady Firm will offer discounts to CEA members on its legal services. Continue reading

New Policy Requirements for Employers Effective April 1, 2016

EmployeeHandbook_Pop_6467Beginning April 1, 2016, California employers with five or more total employees (whether or not all of those employees live in California) must update their anti-discrimination, anti-harassment, and complaint-investigation policies, and distribute them to employees for signature. These policies must be in compliance with recent amendments to California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), and must be distributed to all employees.

attorney clientThe new regulations include the following:

  • Provides for additional protected classes under the FEHA;
  • Clarifies harassment liability;
  • Updates legal standards and legal remedies of discrimination;
  • Revises complaint procedures;
  • Clarifies the investigation process;
  • Expands record-keeping requirements; and
  • Expands the rights of pregnant employees and employees with service animals.

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Valentine’s Day Special- $150 Off Employment Law Packages

New Year’s has come and gone, and we are now six weeks into 2016!  Haven’t had time to update your Employee Handbook, policies and procedures, or personnel files? The Grady Firm is here to help!

In order to show love to our deserving customers, we are offering a discount of $150.00 off our employment law advising packages through February 29, 2016.  To find out more about our services, book a time to speak with our employment law attorneys, or call 323-450-9010 by the end of the month, and mention this promotion.

Has Your Company Been Keeping Track of Accrued Paid Sick Leave Time Since January 1?

As you may be aware, on July 1, 2015, a new law affecting millions of Californians went into effect requiring that employers – both public and private – provide paid sick leave to all their employees. Under the new law, employers will have to modify or update existing paid sick leave or time off policies, as well as payroll, record-keeping, wage statement, and employee notice procedures.

In addition, employers are required to provide most employees with an individualized Notice to Employee  (required under Labor Code section 2810.5) that includes paid sick leave information.

Has your company been providing its employees with notice of the amount of paid sick leave its employees are entitled to on each wage statement in 2016?

If you have questions about an employer’s responsibility to provide sick leave and notice of hours earned to its employees, The Grady Firm attorneys can review your company’s policies to ensure they are in compliance. Schedule a time to speak with our employment law department today.

Is Your Company Reimbursing Employees for Use of Their Cell Phones?

Updated September 24, 2018

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq.

cell phone

New Cell Phone Laws for Employers

As of January 1, 2016, California employers must reimburse employees for use of their personal cell phones for mandatory business purposes, as decided by the California Appellate Court in Cochran v. Schwan’s Home Service, Inc. The ruling affects millions of employers who must update their company policies in order to stay compliant with the new law.  While this law has been on the books for over two years now, it appears as though many companies have not addressed this law or made it part of their employee reimbursement practices.  Is your company reimbursing its employees for their cell phone call and data usage?  Read below for policy suggestions. Continue reading