The Grady Firm, P.C. Expands to San Francisco and San Diego, California

The San Francisco Office is conveniently located at 555 California Street, San Francisco, CA  94104

The San Francisco Office is conveniently located at 555 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94104

The Grady Firm, P.C. is pleased to announce that it has opened offices in San Francisco and San Diego, California to better serve the needs of its clientele throughout the state. These offices are exciting additions to the current Los Angeles headquarters in the Miracle Mile/Museum District of Los Angeles, which is located across the street from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) on Wilshire Boulevard in the heart of Los Angeles.

At the San Francisco location, The Grady Firm, P.C. offers Startup/business advising, employment law, criminal law, family law, immigration, and Intellectual Property services.

The San Francisco office building is centrally located in the downtown Financial District on 555 California Street.  As the fifth tallest building on the west coast of the United States, it is a monument to San Francisco’s bold natural landscape and one of the most recognized buildings in the country.  Also known as the “Triple 5,” the building has starred in several classic movies, including Dirty Harry (1971), The Towering Inferno (1974), and in the Chuck Norris film, An Eye for an Eye (1981).  The building has easy access to public transportation, including BART and the Muni Metro.

The San Diego office is located at 964 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101

The Granger Building at 964 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101

At the San Diego location, The Grady Firm, P.C. offers services in immigration law, business law, and employment law.  The San Diego office is located in the Romanesque-style, turn of the century Granger Building at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Broadway, the gateway to the world-famous Gaslamp Quarter and Core/Civic District.  Throughout its hundred year history, the Granger building served San Diego as a bank, office space, and even hosted animals for the San Diego Zoo.  The building is close to public transportation.

The Grady Firm, P.C.’s Los Angeles Headquarters at 5900 Wilshire Blvd, 26th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

At the Los Angeles, California headquarters, The Grady Firm, P.C. continues to offer services in Startup/business advising, employment advising, business litigation, employment litigation, immigration, estate planning, and Intellectual Property.

The Grady Firm attorneys are able to serve clients throughout California and the globe through in-person meetings, phone calls, and Skype calls.   To best serve its international clientele, The Grady Firm attorneys are fluent in Spanish, Chinese, French, Hindi, Punjabi, Armenian, Swedish, Hungarian, Korean, and Russian.

Schedule a complimentary 15-minute consultation today with The Grady Firm attorneys by calling (323) 450-9010, or submitting a contact request form.

 

Why Does Your Company Need an Employee Handbook?

EmployeeHandbook_Pop_6467Wage and hour disputes are on the rise in California, where the laws tend to favor the employee over the employer.  One of the first things that plaintiff’s counsel will ask for in a lawsuit is a copy of the company’s Employee Handbook, so it is essential that a company have a tailored, up-to-date Handbook that outlines the company’s policies, along with the relevant California leave laws.

Employee Handbooks should be updated annually, and the signature pages must be kept in the employee’s personnel files as evidence that the employee reviewed the document.

Read the full article here.

The Grady Firm. P.C. attorneys provide custom-drafted Employee Handbooks and forms to make the lives easier for company owners and Human Resources Managers.  To learn how we may be able to assist you, schedule a complimentary 15-minute consultation with our attorneys here, or call (323) 450-9010.

Which Funding Options are Available to Help Entrepreneurs Start and Grow Their Businesses?

CROWDFUNDING, VENTURE CAPITAL, AND GOVERNMENT GRANTS

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Tristan Younghaus, Esq.

Starting a business can be an exciting, yet costly endeavor. Entrepreneurs need Startup capital to cover the cost of living expenses, salaries, overhead, legal fees, filing fees, marketing/advertising, shipping costs, and even production costs. There are numerous funding options available, from interest free loans to venture capital.

In this two part series, we explore the various options that are available for small business owners and entrepreneurs. In the event business owners and entrepreneurs are unable or unwilling to secure funding in the form of loans from family, friends, bank loans, or Small Business Administration (SBA) loans, they may want to consider exploring other sources of funding, such as crowdfunding, venture capital, and government grants. Continue reading

U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Requires Many Children to Restart the Immigration Process When They Turn 21

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Anthony Mance, Esq.

ImageIn a divided 5-4 decision on June 9, 2014, the United States Supreme Court struck a blow to the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA), a law that preserves an applicant’s “minor” status during the often lengthy wait time for an immigrant visa. In upholding the Board of Immigration Appeals’ restrictive interpretation of the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) in Scialabba v. Vuellar de Osario, the Court addressed the issue involving immigrant Permanent Resident petitions on behalf of individuals with dependent children who “age out” (turn 21) while their petition is pending.

Under this decision, once these children “age-out”, they will essentially lose their place in the visa line alongside their parents. The Supreme Court majority ruled that in essence, despite having waited his or her turn in line, once the child reaches the age of 21 and “ages out”, the child has to find his or her own basis for applying for a Green Card and start the process over again. For many, the only basis that will be available to an adult child of a Permanent Resident, is acting as a derivative beneficiary of their parents’ application. In practice this will mean not only having to wait for their parents to obtain their own Green Card first, but also having to wait for a Green Card to become available for their own category. Continue reading

What Types of Lending Options are Available to help Entrepreneurs Start and Grow Their Businesses?

PERSONAL LOANS, BANK LOANS, AND SBA LOANS

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Tristan Younghaus, Esq.

Starting a business can be an exciting, yet costly endeavor. Entrepreneurs need startup capital to cover the cost of living expenses, salaries, overhead, legal fees, filing fees, marketing/advertising, shipping costs, and even production costs. There are numerous funding options available, from interest free loans to venture capital. In this two part series, we will explore the various options that are available for small business owners and entrepreneurs. In this blog, we will discuss loans/gifts from family and friends, bank loans, and Small Business Administration loans. The next posting will explore government grants, venture capital, and crowdfunding.

1. Loans/Gifts From Family and Friends

ImageOne of the most common places entrepreneurs begin when searching for funding is by soliciting loans from family and friends. These personal loans are not considered to be a “loan” by the Internal Revenue Service unless the terms of the agreement are stated in writing, (i.e. by stating the loan amount and the interest rate to be paid). Otherwise, after January 1, 2013, the IRS considers the money given to be a gift, and subject to the Federal Gift Tax, if the loan amount is over $14,000.

For borrowers, it may be most advantageous to have the terms of the loan written loosely, and to set proper expectations for all parties involved. For example, in order to preserve the integrity of the personal relationship, the borrower should make it clear that the loan should actually be considered a “gift” in the lender’s mind, and that the lender maintain the expectation that it may never be paid back. This is due to the high likelihood that the money will not be recouped. The borrower may want to avoid memorializing a specific date of repayment, with terms such as, “borrower to pay back loan when monthly income is greater than $10,000.00,” or whenever a reasonable amount is reached. Continue reading

Interview with Syama Meagher, host of Ignite Startup School 105: Optimizing E-Commerce

Syama Meagher will be teaching Ignite Startup School 105: Optimizing E-Commerce on June 10, 2014 from 12-1 p.m. PST.

Syama Meagher

Syama Meagher

  1. You are the founder of Scaling Retail, a fashion retail and brand consulting firm. How did you get to that point in your career?

I founded the business back in 2009, and it happened while I was working at Barneys in their Ecommerce division. I had a meeting with the supplying office, and I met with a lot of designers and brands who needed help and guidance to successfully grow their business and make them better. I knew that I had those skills, and that I could fill a niche.

  Continue reading

How Do You Save Your Marriage from Your Startup? Who Gets the Company in the Divorce?

Excerpt From Inc. Magazine

Image“Maintaining a marriage is hard enough as it is. The national divorce rate is at an all-time high, and it has doubled for Americans over age 35 in the past two decades, according to an April report by researchers at the University of Minnesota. Nearly half of all people who have been married undergo a divorce or separation by their late 50s. Though there has been scant research on the topic of entrepreneurs and divorce, many founders say that the overwhelming pressures and demands of launching a company have wreaked havoc on their marriages. What’s worse, a failed marriage can all too easily destroy even a thriving entrepreneurial business.

Even some of the most successful entrepreneurs have experienced marital failure. Last year, Google co-founder Sergey Brin separated from his wife, Anne Wojcicki, the co-founder of DNA-testing company 23andMe. In 2010, Wynn Resorts founders Steve and Elaine Wynn got divorced–for the second time. And Elon Musk, founder of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, has been divorced twice since 2010.

Nine states (Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin) have community property laws that dictate all assets accumulated by the couple during the marriage be split down the middle. That includes company stock. In some cases, companies have been sold to raise cash to pay off spouses. In others, brawling exes have been forced to become business partners.

Even if you try to shield your spouse from the daily travails of running a company–the nearly missed payrolls and the personnel problems–those pressures have a way of following you home.”

Read the full article here.

The Grady Firm, P.C. is a full-service law firm catering to business owners and their families. As the “pre-nup attorney for businesses,” founder Jennifer Grady, Esq. and her team of attorneys in the Business Advising Department draft Bylaws, Operating Agreements, Buy/Sell Agreements, and Shareholder Agreements to protect their entrepreneur clients from their partnerships going awry.  The Grady Firm’s Estate Planning Department protects business owners’ assets through trusts and asset protection methods.

To find out how to protect your family and your business, schedule a complimentary 15-minute consultation today, or call (323) 450-9010.

Which U.S. Visas are Available for People in the Arts and Entertainment Industry?

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Anthony Mance, Esq.

For artists, chefs, musicians, dancers, athletes, performers, and other individuals with talent in the art and entertainment industry, there are numerous visa types available to enter and work in the United States on a non-immigrant visa. Read below to learn about the visa types that may be available to such individuals.

O-1: Individuals With Extraordinary Ability or Achievement

TheImage O-1 visa is reserved for a very limited group of people possessing exceptional abilities in the arts, sciences, education, entertainment or business. To qualify for an O-1 visa, the applicant must not only be considered “world-class” in his or her profession, but must be internationally known and recognized for their achievements. According to USCIS, to qualify for an O-1 visa, the applicant must be able to demonstrate a “sustained national or international acclaim.”

As a general rule, a successful O-1 application will include letters of recommendation from recognized individuals and organizations in the relevant field, and demonstrable proof that the applicant is nationally or internationally recognized. Continue reading

Learn How to Comply with California Labor Laws at Ignite Startup School 103 Webinar on May 7, 2014

ImageOn May 7, 2014, from 12:00 to 2:00 p.m. PST, employers will learn what they need to know to become compliant with California and Federal Labor Laws in the Ignite Startup School webinar #103.

Now that your business is ready to hire employees, it becomes subject to California labor and employment laws.  Wage and hour lawsuits have gone up 300% since the year 2000, and each lawsuit can costs employers hundreds of thousands of dollars in attorney’s fees, settlement costs, and lost profits. 

 

Don’t be a statistic—arm yourself from employee lawsuits in this 2-hour course, in which you will learn: Continue reading

Common Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make When Involving Business Partners- Entrepreneur Podcast Network Interview with Jennifer Grady, Esq.

EPN logo

Jennifer Grady, Founding Attorney and Business Consultant at The Grady Firm, P.C. joins Enterprise Radio working in conjunction with the EPN Legal Corner & eLosAngeles. Jennifer discusses common mistakes made by entrepreneurs when involving business partners.

Listen to interview with host Eric Dye & guest Jennifer Grady discuss the following:

  • Tell me about why you founded The Grady Firm and how you help entrepreneurs?
  • With the current “Do It Yourself” mentality promoted on the Internet today, why is it important for entrepreneurs and business owners to work with an attorney?
  • What are some of the most crucial documents that business owners need at each stage of the business cycle?
  • What are some of the most common mistakes that you see entrepreneurs make when working with business partners?
  • What are some resources that are available to entrepreneurs who seek legal counsel and moral support as they move forward with the endeavors?

Listen to the Podcast here.

If I have a legitimate marriage, why do I need an immigration attorney to help me apply for a Green Card? A Case Study

by Anthony Mance, Esq. and Jennifer A. Grady, Esq.

Image

One of the most direct paths to a Green Card is by marriage to an American citizen. However, Permanent Residency is by no means guaranteed, even when the marriage is legitimate. Discovering sham marriages is a top enforcement priority of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). When a couple enters into a sham marriage for the purposes of committing immigration fraud, not only can the application be denied, but the U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident spouse can face up to five years in prison and/or a $250,000 fine.

Even if the immigrants themselves are not prosecuted criminally, they will in all likelihood simply be deported (removed) and never allowed to return to the United States, even if they later enter into a real marriage with a U.S. citizen. In order to distinguish a legitimate marriage from a sham marriage, it is crucial to work with an attorney to ensure that DHS is able to approve your Green Card application based on the evidence supporting the marriage’s legitimacy. The following case example illustrates the importance of this matter. Continue reading

The Top Six I-9 Compliance Issues to Avoid

ImageTo many employers and HR professionals, an I-9 form may appear to be a simple one-page piece of hiring paperwork. However, the one page I-9 form comes with enough rules and regulations to fill a 69-page how-to manual, the M-274 Handbook for Employers.

There are many common mistakes and human errors that can be made while completing and maintaining I-9 records. If an employer fails to complete or maintain I-9 documentation correctly, that employer may fall out of compliance with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) rules and suffer harsh financial penalties.

Continue Reading.

For additional information, visit: http://www.uscis.gov/i-9 and

http://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/Employment-Tax-Forms

How Business Owners Can Reduce Their Risk of Lawsuits and Protect Their Assets- FREE Webinar on April 29, 2014

ImageImageJoin Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. (attorney and business consultant at The Grady Firm, P.C.) and George Zeeks (Coach/Trainer/Team Leader at the Automotive Training Institute) as they discuss the ins and outs of the legal process as it applies to small business owners!

Using her background as a trial lawyer and business consultant, Jennifer helps Repair Shop owners and managers by teaching them ways to recognize potential problems and protect themselves from lawsuits by employees or customers.

 

Together, we’ll discover some of the common mistakes you might be doing right now, but don’t even know it.

In this Webinar you will learn:
1. How the legal process affects you, the small business owner.
2. The unexpected price you may pay for seemingly insignificant things.
3. What you may be doing wrong and don’t even know it!
4. When you need to hire an attorney, and how to find the right one.
5. What type of paperwork you’ll need to protect yourself and avoid becoming a victim

DATE: Tuesday, April 29, 2014

TIME: 7:00 p.m. EST and again at 7 p.m. PST.

RSVP: Space is limited: Reserve your spot today!

 

Ignite Startup School Will Feature Online Courses in Order to Bring Business Education to Entrepreneurs Around the Country

ImageCatering to the Millennial and Generation X audience interested in entrepreneurship, Jennifer A. Grady, Esq.—Startup attorney, business consultant, and entrepreneur herself—recently launched Ignite Startup School, a unique platform from which she can help business owners achieve their dreams of entrepreneurship. While teaching Members the practical essentials needed to succeed in starting a business, Jennifer empowers other men and women like herself with the tools they need to attain financial freedom, self-sufficiency, and an exclusive network of other like-minded individuals.

By catering to “bootstrapped” founders, Ignite Startup School provides cost-effective educational and legal services for entrepreneurs and business owners by teaching them what they can do themselves, and when to hire an expert. Members of Ignite Startup School gain access to an online and offline community of similarly situated entrepreneurs through online Courses, Members-only Message Boards, and discounts on small business services through Ignite Startup School’s Preferred Partners program. Customized legal services eliminate the need for, and risk incurred by, the “do-it-yourself” mentality.

Online Courses begin on April 23, 2014 and continue on a weekly basis thereafter.

The current schedule is as follows:

Startup School 101: The Practical Aspects of Running a Business, on April 23, 2014 from 12-2 pm;

Startup School 102: The Legal Aspects of Running a Business on May 1, 2014 from 12-2 p.m.;

Startup School 103: What California Employers Need to Know to be Compliant with State and Federal Labor Laws on May 7, 2014 from 12-2 p.m.; and

Startup School 104: Business Succession Planning and Asset Protection on May 14, 2014 from 12-1 pm.

Don’t Have a Million Dollars to Invest? The E-2 Visa Provides an Affordable Investment-Based Option to Obtain a U.S. Visa

by Jennifer A. Grady, Esq. and Anthony Mance, Esq.

Image For foreign investors wishing to come to the United States, there are several options, depending on the amount of the investment and the investor’s desired amount of involvement in a U.S. business. The most well-known option, the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program (aka “Million Dollar Visa”), allows foreign investors to obtain Permanent Resident status in the United States by investing between $500,000 and $1 million in a U.S. enterprise.

While this program provides a relatively straightforward route to immigration, the high monetary requirements and corresponding investment risk make it inaccessible to many foreign entrepreneurs. Fortunately, for citizens of a select group of countries, there is an alternative that is both more affordable and less complex. Continue reading